Garageland: Taiwan part 1

Part 2, 3, 4, 5

Mini documentary into the present Taiwan indie music scene, as well as some of the historical conditions…

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Epic Field/Sound/Noise Recording Post Part 1

So I introduced Post-Concrete’s site a little while ago…here

Since then I’m happily back with more stuff to share, so here it is below:

1. Sub Jam

Chinese independent and experimental music may be looked upon as something of an oddity in its homeland. And to Western ears, it may sound odder still. But that hasn’t stopped Yan Hun, the founder (in 2000) of the Sub Jam label, and one of the pioneers in China’s experimental music scene, from doing what he does best. Which is just about everything. Yan is involved in many arts: poetry, music, film and literature. But his most lasting accomplishment may be that he has proved that the fusion of electronic sounds with poetry works. Last year, Sub Jam released Nowise Assault, a 60-minute CD of made-in-China electronica, more specifically ‘leftfield electronic music’ blending artificial sounds with spirituality and poetic ambience. In this entry, 718, aka Sun Lei, a central figure in the experimental scene, offers ambient music and down tempo beats featuring ethnic or/and industrial influences. “Taoism or Calm” intermingles drum solos into a spiritual atmosphere; while “Over and Over” provides more than seven minutes of noise with an industrial edge. “Aluminum” is a straight piece performed on the piano, the crystalline purity of which is at one point corrupted by lowfi noise. Say what you will, this is highly addictive, hypnotic music.

Credit: Thomas Podvin @ That’s Shanghai Magazine

Sub Jam’s Website

Sub Jam Releases

Their introduction to their label:

In 2000 Sub Jam started to publish independent music, film and literature works. Tie Tuo (铁托) has been chosen as Chinese name of this label.
logo was designed by Fang Wuxing.
In end of 2004, Kwanyin Records start its activity as audio/video publishing department of Sub Jam. Tie Tuo (铁托) was therefore end to be used.
Tie Tuo (铁托) is Chinese translation of Tito, the leader of the Communist Party of former Yugoslavia. It was also the name of a supporter of Beijing underground music.

2. Sound Pocket

A sort of collective from Hong Kong, who have had several different events aimed at promoting different interests in sound (they’re also registered as a charitable organisation):

soundpocket is a promoter, educator, facilitator, and gatherer. We work in the fields of sound, art and culture. We find sound in diverse and dynamic relations with many different art forms (visual art, installation art, music, theatre, dance etc.), and with a variety of cultural contexts that give meanings to our lives. We would like to work with all those who share this active interest in sound.

soundpocket supports not just an art form, but ideas and possibilities that engage with aesthetically meaningful, culturally-grounded and publicly relevant sonic practices, which have a lot to teach about how we understand the world and the experiences yet to be valued.

IF YOU LISTEN, YOU CAN BE ANYWHERE

Sound Pocket Website, you can look at their current and past projects, news and some interviews in English with sound artists.

3. Chiayi Sound Project

Chiayi Sound Project initiated from 2008. It mainly focuses on field recording in southern Taiwan – Chiayi, the recording topics include oral history, nature environment, folk music, industry, religion and local events. This is an example of how a region can be explored by the listening.

On the Chiayi Sound Project blog, you can listen to field recordings by Yannick Dauby and Yen-Ting Hsu  from Chiayi in Southern Taiwan. The recordings are still being made in 2010.

Chiayi Sound Project

2 recordings: Preparing the sticky rice for Mayasvi & Treefrogs singing during Mayasvi, made available for free download at Compost and Height.

Epic Field/Sound/Noise Recording Post Part 1

So I introduced Post-Concrete’s site a little while ago…here

Since then I’m happily back with more stuff to share, so here it is below:

1. Sub Jam

Chinese independent and experimental music may be looked upon as something of an oddity in its homeland. And to Western ears, it may sound odder still. But that hasn’t stopped Yan Hun, the founder (in 2000) of the Sub Jam label, and one of the pioneers in China’s experimental music scene, from doing what he does best. Which is just about everything. Yan is involved in many arts: poetry, music, film and literature. But his most lasting accomplishment may be that he has proved that the fusion of electronic sounds with poetry works. Last year, Sub Jam released Nowise Assault, a 60-minute CD of made-in-China electronica, more specifically ‘leftfield electronic music’ blending artificial sounds with spirituality and poetic ambience. In this entry, 718, aka Sun Lei, a central figure in the experimental scene, offers ambient music and down tempo beats featuring ethnic or/and industrial influences. “Taoism or Calm” intermingles drum solos into a spiritual atmosphere; while “Over and Over” provides more than seven minutes of noise with an industrial edge. “Aluminum” is a straight piece performed on the piano, the crystalline purity of which is at one point corrupted by lowfi noise. Say what you will, this is highly addictive, hypnotic music.

Credit: Thomas Podvin @ That’s Shanghai Magazine

Sub Jam’s Website

Sub Jam Releases

Their introduction to their label:

In 2000 Sub Jam started to publish independent music, film and literature works. Tie Tuo (铁托) has been chosen as Chinese name of this label.
logo was designed by Fang Wuxing.
In end of 2004, Kwanyin Records start its activity as audio/video publishing department of Sub Jam. Tie Tuo (铁托) was therefore end to be used.
Tie Tuo (铁托) is Chinese translation of Tito, the leader of the Communist Party of former Yugoslavia. It was also the name of a supporter of Beijing underground music.

2. Sound Pocket

A sort of collective from Hong Kong, who have had several different events aimed at promoting different interests in sound (they’re also registered as a charitable organisation):

soundpocket is a promoter, educator, facilitator, and gatherer. We work in the fields of sound, art and culture. We find sound in diverse and dynamic relations with many different art forms (visual art, installation art, music, theatre, dance etc.), and with a variety of cultural contexts that give meanings to our lives. We would like to work with all those who share this active interest in sound.

soundpocket supports not just an art form, but ideas and possibilities that engage with aesthetically meaningful, culturally-grounded and publicly relevant sonic practices, which have a lot to teach about how we understand the world and the experiences yet to be valued.

IF YOU LISTEN, YOU CAN BE ANYWHERE

Sound Pocket Website, you can look at their current and past projects, news and some interviews in English with sound artists.

3. Chiayi Sound Project

Chiayi Sound Project initiated from 2008. It mainly focuses on field recording in southern Taiwan – Chiayi, the recording topics include oral history, nature environment, folk music, industry, religion and local events. This is an example of how a region can be explored by the listening.

On the Chiayi Sound Project blog, you can listen to field recordings by Yannick Dauby and Yen-Ting Hsu  from Chiayi in Southern Taiwan. The recordings are still being made in 2010.

Chiayi Sound Project

2 recordings: Preparing the sticky rice for Mayasvi & Treefrogs singing during Mayasvi, made available for free download at Compost and Height.